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Futures in Fiction

In this podcast, we hear from author Kim Stanley Robinson as he shares insights from writing the book Ministry for the Future and about the science behind events in the novel.

Published onJan 15, 2022
Futures in Fiction
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Abstract

In this podcast, we hear from author Kim Stanley Robinson as he shares insights from writing the book Ministry for the Future and about the science behind events in the novel. Robinson talks about why he began writing science fiction and its importance for envisioning alternative futures. He speaks directly to incoming undergraduate students about how all disciplines are needed to address the problems of global change and offers advice for approaching college education.

Kim Stanley Robinson is the author of more than 20 books, including Ministry for the Future, New York 2140, 2312, and the international bestselling Mars trilogy: Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars. His work imagines both the devastating effects of climate change and the ways in which people can create new economic systems and positive futures based on social equality and ecological reality. In 2016 he received the Heinlein Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction, and asteroid 72432 was named “Kimrobinson.” In 2017 he was given the Arthur C. Clarke Award for Imagination in Service to Society.

Futures in Fiction (Kim Stanley Robinson)

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience. It is available for noncommercial reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 4.0 License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. Kim Stanley Robinson’s website

  2. Greene, L. (2020, October 7). Kim Stanley Robinson holds out hope. Nautilus. https://nautil.us/issue/90/something-green/kim-stanley-robinson-holds-out-hope  

  3. Robinson, K.S. (2018, March 20). Empty half of the Earth of its humans. It’s the only way to save the planet. The Guardian.

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