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The World Is Our Oyster; Don’t Mess It Up

In this talk, John Millhauser, Ph.D., shares how shellfish have been a part of human diets for as long as humans have been human.

Published onAug 11, 2022
The World Is Our Oyster; Don’t Mess It Up
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Abstract

In this talk, John Millhauser, Ph.D., shares how shellfish have been a part of human diets for as long as humans have been human. Using examples of archaeological research from around the world, he provides a tour of humanity's relationship with shellfish over the last 150,000 years to reveal the complex relationships among humans, their environments, and their societies. Learning about this past can help us make better decisions about how to produce and consume foods in the future.

Millhauser is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. He is an anthropological archaeologist interested in how the kinds of work that people do shapes and is shaped by their social worlds, the environment, and the broader political economy. He focuses on people who lived in central Mexico during the Aztec and Spanish empires and uses archaeological and ethnohistoric data to give a voice to people who are typically silent in the historical record. By doing so, he hopes to contribute to a more comprehensive and inclusive understanding of past societies and provide context for understanding our own circumstances.

The World Is Our Oyster; Don’t Mess It Up (John Millhauser)

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience. It is available for noncommercial reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 4.0 License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. Freshwater Mussels Presentation by Dr. Jennifer M. Archambault

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