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Early Cities and Settlements

Archaeologists Tate Paulette, Ph.D. and Kathryn Grossman, Ph.D. describe the stories of the first settlements and cities and the circumstances that spawned many of the diseases we still battle today.

Published onJun 22, 2022
Early Cities and Settlements
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Abstract

Archaeologists Tate Paulette, Ph.D. and Kathryn Grossman, Ph.D. describe the stories of the first settlements and cities and the circumstances that spawned many of the diseases we still battle today. Dr. Tate Paulette’s research focuses on food, hygiene, and beer. Dr. Kate Grossman’s research focuses on the domestic animals humans relied on.

Kate Grossman is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses that cover world prehistory, the archaeology of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, archaeological theory, and the archaeology of animals. Her research focuses on human-animal interactions, early cities, and the development of complex societies. She has participated in archaeological excavations in Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, and Iraq, and is currently co-editing the final report on excavations at the site of Tell Qarqur, in Syria, where she worked from 2006 to 2010. She directs the Makounta-Voules Archaeological Project, an excavation project that studies the politics of village life in prehistoric Cyprus. NC State students accompany her to Cyprus each summer for a Study Abroad course that teaches undergraduate students the basics of archaeological research.

Tate Paulette is an assistant professor in the Department of History, where he teaches courses in the history of agriculture, ancient history, and archaeology. A native of Hickory, NC, he has conducted archaeological fieldwork in Cyprus, Syria, Egypt, Turkey, Israel, Scotland, and the southeastern United States. He currently co-directs an excavation project and field school at the site of Makounta-Voules-Mersinoudia on the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean (Makounta-Voules Archaeological Project). His research explores agriculture, food, fermentation, and political life in the world’s first cities and states, with a focus on Bronze Age (c. 3000–1200 BCE) Mesopotamia. He has spearheaded a collaborative effort to recreate Sumerian beer using authentic ingredients, equipment, and brewing techniques, and he is currently working on a book about the history of beer in Mesopotamia

Early Cities and Settlements (Kathryn Grossman and Tate Paulette)

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience. It is available for noncommercial reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 4.0 License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. The plague at Athens, Greece (429 BCE)

  2. The plague prayers of Mursili II (c. 1321–1295 BCE)

  3. Beer in ancient Mesopotamia

  4. Trash, toilets, and disease in ancient Mesopotamia

  5. Archaeological field school in Cyprus

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