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Listening to Climate Change

How and why music and sound offer distinct opportunities for studying environmental change, and what these media can provide to us that other forms of intervention cannot. 

Published onJan 15, 2022
Listening to Climate Change
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Abstract

This podcast discusses three approaches to recording, studying, and presenting narratives about the sounds of environmental change from 1850 to today. It questions how and why music and sound offer distinct opportunities for studying environmental change, and what these media can provide to us that other forms of intervention cannot. 

Kirsten Paige is an assistant teaching professor of musicology at NC State. Prior to coming to NC State, she was a postdoctoral fellow in music at Stanford University for three years, and earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, her master’s degree from  University of Cambridge, and her bachelor’s degree from University of Chicago. She studied double bass at the Juilliard School from the ages of 13 to 18. Paige's work explores how scientific knowledge reshaped musical practices and aural cultures in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Her essays have appeared in journals including The Cambridge Opera Journal, Opera Quarterly, 19th-Century Music, and Journal of the Royal Musical Association. Her first book, Richard Wagner’s Political Ecology, is under contract with University of Chicago Press.

Listening to Climate Change (Kirsten S. Paige)

This podcast was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. Dr. Paige’s publications on Wagner and climate

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