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Decision-Making and the Shadowy Brain — Part 1

To take more control over your own decisions (what to do, what to believe, how to think critically), it helps to understand the deep secrets of learning (Part 1/2).

Published onJan 15, 2022
Decision-Making and the Shadowy Brain — Part 1
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Abstract

To take more control over your own decisions (what to do, what to believe, how to think critically), it helps to understand the deep secrets of learning. In this video (Part 1 of 2), Jane Lubischer, Ph.D. shares what your brain can learn without your approval, and how you can use this knowledge to become a better critical thinker and a more open-eyed and thoughtful decision-maker.

Jane Lubischer went to college to become an English teacher, decided she would rather be a basketball coach, discovered a major where she could study both biology and psychology, and finally ended up earning a Ph.D. in neuroscience. Now she spends much of her work life designing and building better courses, curricula, and programs for all undergraduate students at NC State.

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. TED. (2009, Oct. 7). The danger of a single story | Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie [Video]. YouTube.

  2. Dr. Brenda Milner. She isn’t at NC State, but she is a neuroscience rock star!

  3. Milner, B. (2005). The medial temporal-lobe amnesic syndrome. The Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 28(3), 599-611.

  4. H.M., an unforgettable amnesiac, dies at 82New York Times (Online), New York: New York Times Company. Nov 5, 2008. 

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