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Honey Bees in the Larger Context of Pollination

Given the plight of all pollinators, including honey bees, David Tarpy, Ph.D. highlights our need to work toward a more sustainable apiculture system to promote all of agriculture.

Published onJan 15, 2022
Honey Bees in the Larger Context of Pollination
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Abstract

While there are many different types of bees, only honey bees are semi-domesticated and managed by beekeepers on a large scale. As a result, beekeepers are fundamentally important to commercial production agriculture by providing pollination services to approximately 100 different fruit, vegetable, nut, and row crops, responsible for about one-third of what we eat every day. Given the plight of all pollinators, including honey bees, David Tarpy, Ph.D. highlights our need to work toward a more sustainable apiculture system to promote all of agriculture.

David Tarpy is broadly interested in the biology and behavior of honey bees, with projects investigating their mating system and genetic diversity, molecular and pollination ecology, oxidative stress and social immunity, disease ecology, and queen reproductive quality. His work has provided some of the best empirical evidence that multiple mating by queens confers significant benefits to colonies through increased genetic diversity of their nestmates. Tarpy is a professor in the Department of Applied Ecology at NC State.

Honey Bees in the Larger Context of Pollination (David Tarpy)

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience.

TRANSCRIPT

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