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The History of Maize

In this video, Jim Holland, Ph.D., first discusses the characteristics of the wild grass called teosinte, which was domesticated about 9000 years ago in Southern Mexico.

Published onAug 11, 2022
The History of Maize
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Abstract

In this video, Jim Holland, Ph.D., first discusses the characteristics of the wild grass called teosinte, which was domesticated about 9000 years ago in Southern Mexico. Ancient peoples selected natural variants that were more amenable to harvest and consumption by humans, eventually resulting in creating maize, or the corn we know today. He then discusses the spread of maize to most of the Americas, from Canada to Chile. 

Holland received a bachelor’s degree in biology from Johns Hopkins, a master’s degree in plant breeding and plant genetics from University of Wisconsin, and a doctorate in crop science from NC State University. Holland is a USDA-ARS Research Geneticist located at NC State, researching the genetic diversity and breeding of corn.

The History of Maize (Jim Holland)

This video was originally produced for an audience of entering first-year and transfer students at NC State University as a part of an interdisciplinary experience. It is available for noncommercial reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 4.0 License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

TRANSCRIPT

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

  1. An Un-Corn-Ventional Collector by Paul Mangelsdorf

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